Salt Lake City: A Day in the Life

Bring! Bring! Bring! I roll over and unlock my phone, turning the alarm off.  Groaning, I pull the covers over my head, not ready to get out of the toasty bed.  After nearly falling back asleep, I start scrolling through Twitter, hoping the brightness of my screen will get my brain synapses firing.  In the meantime, Zach is up and nearly ready to leave.  He puts on his shoes which is my cue to stop grumbling and start getting ready to face the day ahead. I throw on my jeans, the first shirt I grab and then a few more layers – these late October mornings are getting chilly.  After brushing my teeth, Zach, who’s been patiently waiting for the last ten minutes, and I say goodbye to Lucy and head out to work.

Salt Lake City morning

Since we’re staying near downtown, in the factory district, the drive to Starbucks is short.  We place our usual order, two everything bagels, toasted with cream cheese, a grande black coffee for me, and a venti coffee for Zach.  We head to separate tables and get to work.  I spend the morning chugging along on my assigned issue.  I’m working on switching over some queries to a read-only database.  In laymen’s terms, I’m trying to make our system able to handle more people using it.  As usual, Zach’s morning contains more meetings than mine;  I only have my team’s daily scrum (our everyday check-in to ask for and offer help).

Hard at work (or hardly working?)

This rarely happens, but our Salt Lake City campground has a good enough internet connection to work from their lobby for the afternoon.  We head back during a break in Zach’s meetings for soup and salad in the camper.  It’s a nice change of pace from our typical lunch of sandwiches in the car.  I spend the rest of the workday in the lobby, which is conveniently located next to the laundry room.  I knock out a load while struggling to test my code changes.  I’m unable to accomplish much workwise but at least I now have clean clothes!

We took very few pictures in SLC

After work, I lay in bed for a short time, allowing my brain to recover from the day, and then change into running clothes.  I fell behind on my goal of 1,000 miles when I sprained my ankle in August, but I am working hard on catching up.  The past few days I’ve run from the campground, but today we drive up to Antelope Island, a state park 30 miles north of downtown.  The island, occasionally a peninsula (the lake is so shallow that its area fluctuates from less than 1,000 to over 3,000 square miles), is located on the Great Salt Lake.  A buffalo on the side of the road greets us– the park is home to one of the two herds in the state.  The mid-fifty temperature combined with great views of the lake and a 538 politics podcast make for a great workout.  I still feel good when I get back to the car; if it wasn’t for the grumbling in my stomach, I would have added on another mile or two.

The Great Salt Lake

On the way home, we pick up a pizza – black olives and pineapple, my favorite.  We eat and listen to the latest Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me! laughing at all of Paula Poundstone’s jokes.  In addition to running 1,000 miles, I have quite a few other goals for the year – read 50 books, finish a third of my giant cross-stich project, keep this blog semi-up-to-date.  Tonight, I read 25 pages of my current book, The Happy Traveler, while Zach plays Roller Coaster Tycoon on the tablet.  Once he beats the level he’s working on, I work on my cross stich while we watch Band of Brothers.  Not quite ready to go to bed, we watch an Office episode and then another because they’re too darn funny to just watch one.  I remember that I haven’t brushed my teeth so I begrudgingly walk the six feet to the bathroom and do so.  I crawl under the covers, cuddle with Delilah – my zebra pillow pet, and try not to think about work as I drift into a deep sleep.

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Tahoe

After a few great weeks in Hawaii, it was time to head back to our car and trailer in San Francisco. So, for the third time this year we found ourselves spending the night in an airport parking lot. And, since we’re pretty sure spending the night in an airport parking lot is frowned upon, we found ourselves again trying to inconspicuously disembark the shuttle and sneak into the trailer. 100% success so far (knock on wood).

Hawaiian Airlines has the best in-flight meal (free wine!)

The next day we headed northeast to Lake Tahoe – starting our long journey back toward Ohio for the holidays. While we were too late for swimming in the lake, and too early for skiing, we were still able to find plenty to do. Wednesday, we went on a short hike, passing the hordes of salmon that had made their way up the stream to lay eggs. Then, tried out a new disk golf set at Bijou Park. Thursday, we went on another hike, climbing Maggies Peak and finally spotting a bear at a reasonable distance for the first time this trip.

Question, which kind of bear is best?

After rounding out the work week, it was back on the road, driving East into Nevada. On our way to Great Basin National Park, we stopped in Ely, a small town along “Americas Loneliest Road” to watch Ohio State come back to beat Penn State while playing video poker and drinking a beer or two.

Liz won $20 playing Keno!

While we didn’t spend long in Great Basin, we made time to hike through a bristlecone pine grove, seeing some of the oldest living organisms on the planet. The trees can live thousands of years and stand strong hundreds of years after dying due to the fact that their wood grows slowly and tightly enough to prevent rot. Beyond the bristlecone pine grove, we hiked to a glacier before turning around and hitting the road again, destination Salt Lake City.

This tree is older than the city of Rome

Hawaii Part III: Oahu

In high school, I was part of a group called the Shady Ladies.  What may sound like a shifty organization, was just a self-given nickname to my group of running friends.  Sammi, Jessica, Caitlin and I all ran cross country and track and were recognizable by our matching red sunglasses.  We liked to use words like druthers and behoove and frequented Buffalo Wild Wings.  Sammi and Caitlin were significantly faster than me, both went on to run in college, but Jessica and I spent hours each week, fall and spring, running together and chatting about life.

The least awkward picture I could find of us

The four of us stayed in touch throughout college, reuniting at BDubs a few times a year.  Last year, Jessica moved to Hawaii when her then fiancé, now husband, got a job in Oahu as a contractor for the Marines.  I hadn’t seen her since she left Ohio so it only made sense to swing by for a visit while we were in the area.

Jess and I in Hawaii!

Unfortunately, we were out of vacation days which meant back to work.  Zach has a daily meeting at 10 am eastern time so he was up by 4 am Hawaiian time.  I usually slept in until 5 am.  I’ve never used ‘slept in’ and ‘5 am’ in the same sentence before.  On one hand, starting work so early allowed us to have the whole afternoon for activities, but it also meant being very sleepy and going to bed by 8 pm.

The view during my daily run

With our free afternoons, we took in some of the best Oahu has to offer.  A somber visit to Pearl Harbor, a windy afternoon watching kitesurfers at Lanikai Beach, a rainy hike, snorkeling at Hanauma Bay, and dinner at a fabulous farmers’ market with Jess, Ben, and their adorable dog Koa.

Rainy + windy hike

On Saturday, Zach, Jessica, and I took a day trip to the north shore.  We started the day at the Dole Plantation.  It is incredibly touristy but the Dole Whip alone makes its worth the stop.   For those of you, like myself before visiting, who have never heard of Dole Whip, it’s pineapple ice cream that’s only sold at Disneyland, Disney World and the Dole Plantation.  It has a huge cult following, and after eating some I can understand why.  In addition to delicious Dole Whip, the plantation also had the largest gift shop I’ve ever seen.  Who knew there could be so many pineapple related objects?

The best looking pineapple around

Our next stop was Waimea Bay, birthplace of big wave surfing.  They hold surfing competitions here in the winter and in October, the waves were starting to grow but were still a manageable size. Zach and Jessica jumped off the famous Waimea Rock while I bobbed in the waves.  I went cliff-jumping once and that was enough to last a lifetime for me.

Zach mid-jump

After working up an appetite from swimming, we got lunch at Giovanni’s Shrimp Truck.  Their world famous shrimp scampi was worth the long line.  We also stopped at a fruit stand where I tried, for the first time, fresh coconut, rambutan, and dragon fruit.

Giovanni’s Shrimp Scampi

Before we knew it, our twenty days in Hawaii had come to an end. On our last night, Jessica, Ben, Zach and I went to Buffalo Wild Wings, just like old times.  Although sad to leave the Aloha State, I was ready to get back to Lucy and our regular day-to-day life.  Thank you so much to Jessica and Ben for having us and hopefully it’s less than a year and a half until we see each other again!

Medford and More!

Leaving Crater Lake, we headed south to meet up with the rest of Tyler’s family.  While in Medford we repeated some of our favorite activities from our last visit.  Watching Zach’s nieces at their swim lessons, walking down to Roxyann Winery and staying up late every night playing board games and Super Smash Brothers.

Uncle Zach and June

Unfortunately, we also experienced some unwanted activities.  I came down with a bad cold in the beginning and by the end of the week, all of the Oregon Serafinis had caught a stomach bug.  There were a lot of sick people in the house but still managed to enjoy our time together.

Common Block Brewing Company

The six of us headed down to Lassen Volcanic National Park in northern California. The titular Lassen Peak is the largest plug dome volcano in the world and the park is home to all four types of volcano (plug dome, shield, cinder cone, and strato).  I had not heard of Lassen before we started out on our National Park quest so I was surprised to learn it was created in 1916, making it the 11th oldest park.

Selfie with Lassen’s Seismograph Station

We started with the best named trail in the entire park system –  Bumpass Hell.  The hike takes you down into a geothermal area nicknamed ‘Little Yellowstone’.  Having not previously seen anything like it, I was fascinated by the way the ground bubbled, steamed, gurgled, and churned.  The sulfuric acid created fascinating color patterns surrounding the scalding mud pots.

Bumpass Hell from above

Planning on eating out for dinner, we had not gone grocery shopping in preparation for the weekend.  It turned out, our only options less than a ninety-minute drive closed before 5pm. Between a can of clam chowder, some pasta, and a pouch of tuna, we managed to scrounge together a meal for six from our trailer’s limited pantry.  Tyler, Whitney and family slept in the trailer.  After first getting used last week by Tyler, our convertible table bed had its second customer in Sage.  This gave Zach and I an excuse to break out our neglected tent and cuddle under the chilly stars.

Artsy filler picture 

The following morning, after a delicious breakfast at JJ’s Café which would have made Leslie Knope envious, we headed to the north side of the park for another hike.  Cinder Cone Volcano was created by an eruption around 1650 which is recent enough essentially no plants have started growing on it.  The hike to the crater is two miles each way, meandering gently up to the base and ending with a challenging climb (about 700ft in a third of a mile).

Cinder Cone Volcano – they must have used all of their creativity naming Bumpass Hell

The hike out took longer than expected due to a slow moving four-year-old.  Zach and I had more than a five-hour drive ahead of us so we said our goodbyes at the bottom of the volcano and high-tailed it back to our car.  As always, it was great to see Tyler, Whitney, Sage and June.  I’m looking forward to seeing them at Christmas and hoping our next reunion will be healthier and equally as adventurous.

Beautiful sunset driving though California

I forgot that I was planning on including our time in San Fransisco in this blog which is why the previous paragraph sounds like a conclusion.  We were flying out to Hawaii on Wednesday, so in the meantime, we spent three nights at Samuel P. Taylor State Park, about an hour north of the city.  All in all, it wasn’t a great experience – we were worried about catching the stomach bug going around, I always get anxious before big trips and none of the Starbucks in the Bay Area have outlets which makes working from them nearly impossible.  The highlight of the stay was our visit to Point Reyes National Seashore.   One concluding paragraph is difficult enough to write, let alone two, so I’ll just end things here.

We’ll be seeing a lot more of the Pacific in the coming weeks

Ohio / Rainier

It’s interesting how our perception of time is always changing. Sometimes the last half mile of a difficult hike can seem to last forever. Yet, the whole weekend seems over as soon as it starts. I have been very fortunate (or maybe unfortunate) in the past nine months. Nearly everything has flown by. To help keep things in perspective and not lose sight of the amazing adventures we’ve had while experiencing new ones, Liz and I often ask each other “What were we doing a month ago today?” and “Where will we be in a month from now?”. Perhaps the most interesting part of the time change phenomenon is that while the days seem to speed by, I’m always shocked at how long ago the things we did just a few weeks before seem.

It’s already been 3 weeks since Rainer!

Perhaps the fastest time yet this trip was the whirlwind week we spent in Ohio. We had planned on spending two weeks in the Seattle area, but CoverMyMeds offered to fly us in for the work week, so we jumped on the opportunity to catch up with friends and family (and work).

Cymanski Family Reunion 

On Sunday night, Liz and I took a red-eye from Seattle to Columbus and headed straight into work. After work, Liz picked up her sister, Megan, and drove up to Ashland to get dinner with her parents and grandparents. Meanwhile, I took a series of Ubers from work to our AirBnB and back to work again to find a charger for my dying phone before seeing Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats at the LC. Tuesday, we caught up with a group of friends from work for volleyball and trivia. Then, on Wednesday, I managed to stay upright on my first Segway tour. And in the evening Liz and I headed our separate way to grab a few drinks with coworkers. Thursday, we drove up to Canton to see my family and hiked the beautiful new Fry Family park with baby Zion in tow. Then, Friday morning we drove back to C-bus, put in a day’s work, and flew back to Seattle. By the end of the week Liz and I were exhausted. Although, we still had a full weekend ahead of us.

Uncle Zach and Baby Zion

Due to our late arrival in Seattle, we opted to sleep in the airport parking lot (which I’m sure is against some sort of rule). Then, the next morning, we met up with Mark and Ben, my friends from college,  and headed to Mount Rainier. While Ben has twice summited the 14er, it was the first time in the park for the rest of us. Even though we didn’t attempt the technical summit, we did make it up to the Muir basecamp – one of my new favorite hikes. To get to the basecamp, we hiked up about 5,000 feet and across the Muir snowfield. Although going up rewarded us with some spectacular views, it was going down that made the hike.

Camp Muir

The heavily packed snowfield not only allowed us to hike to Muir basecamp without sinking in knee-deep every-other step (like we would the next weekend hiking the South Sister near Bend) it also allowed us to glacade down. For those who don’t know, glacading is just a fancy word for sledding without a sled. Enough hikers had gone before us that nice slick chutes ran down the snowfield, adding a new dynamic to hiking I had never considered. Pro tip: bring a heavy-duty trash bag to act as your sled.

Glasading!

The next morning, before driving Ben and Mark back to Seattle, we hiked up to the nearby Eagle Point to get a panoramic view of Mt Rainier. I hope that someday I can head back to make it all the way up to the summit, although going it to the basecamp is a worthwhile hike in of itself.

Drinking our summit beers!

Bend and Beyond

After dropping Ben and Mark off in Seattle, we headed South to Oregon.  There was a bit of a mishap in our accommodations (we thought our campground reservations started on Monday night, but they actually were for Tuesday) which resulted in an extra night spent in a Walmart parking lot.  We’re becoming experts at sleeping in Walmart lots and they’re really not that bad.  There’s usually bright lights shining throughout the night, occasionally loud cars and not all allow overnight parking but it saves money, time and the effort of finding a campground.

Lucy in a Walmart Parking lot

On Tuesday, we made it to LaPine State Park, our home for the week.  The park, just South of Bend, is home to ‘Big Red’ the world girthiest ponderosa pine.  It was also the most voluminous but it recently lost a good chunk of its height to a lightning strike.  There were some great trails for running – not too rooty or rocky and, most importantly, flat.  The Deschutes River runs through the park making for some great scenery.

A bend in the Deschutes River

We visited Smith Rock State Park, home to some of the best rock climbing in the country.  Although we didn’t go climbing, the scenery itself was magnificent.  We had a delicious dinner at Sunriver Brewing company.  I ordered a Rueben Pretzel Calzone, which sounds like a strange combination but was really great.

Smith Rock State Park

On Saturday morning, Zach’s brother Tyler drove up from Medford to spend the weekend with us.  We planned to hike the South Sister, the youngest and tallest of the volcanoes which make up the Three Sisters.  Unbeknownst to us, the higher elevations had received a large amount of snow the previous week.  The trail was completely covered, in some places with well over five feet of snow.

Two brothers and someone else’s sister

We progressed very slowly up the mountain.  As the day warmed up, the snow became softer, and soon, every third step led to being knee deep, or sometimes even hip deep, in snow.  We didn’t make it to the top, instead drinking our summit beers at a pass about a mile before the end.  The guys were disappointed about turning around but there were some very menacing clouds heading our way and Zach had frozen feet.

Our summit

The way down was much faster (thanks gravity!) and Zach snapped this awesome picture of Tyler jumping down the hill.  Once again very happy with our camera purchase.  I greatly struggled deciding which pictures to use for this post.

Flying down the mountain

Sunday morning we left La Pine and headed to Crater Lake National Park.  We visited the park in May, the last time we were in Oregon, but there had been a ton of snow which was really fun but I wanted to visit the park without the snow to see what it was like.  It was too late in the year to wish for no snow but there was significantly less than last time.

Crater Lake National Park

The rim is an average of 1,000 feet above the lake but there is one place you can hike to the water, traveling 800ft down in less than a mile of trail.  I stuck my feet in the water but Zach was the only one brave enough to fully get in.  And by that, I mean he jumped off a cliff into the lake.  On the hike up, we tried to calculate the volume of water in the lake.   We knew that at widest points, it is about 4 miles wide  and 6 miles long and the deepest point is 1,932 ft.  Given those three data points, we estimated the volume to be 12.5 cubic km, only 6 cu km off from the actual volume of 18 cubic km.  That may seem like a decent ways off but I was happy to be in the right order of magnitude.  Our main source of error was underestimating the average depth by 100 meters (we guessed 250m, it’s actually 350m).

The equivalent of 5 million Olympic swimming pools

 

Canada Part 2 (Banff)

We spent nearly a year planning our trip prior to hitting the road – marking points of interest on a map, researching car and lodging options, and reading about the national parks. In all that time, I don’t remember ever discussing taking our trip beyond the US. Yet, for the second week this summer, we found ourselves in Canada. This time, instead of a remote island on the French River, we stayed in a campground within the city limits of Calgary.

Oh Canada!

While visiting a brewery in Calgary, Liz and I met a few locals who made a point to remind us that Canadians tend to know a lot more about the US than we know about their affairs. So, for those unaware, Calgary is Canada’s third largest city with about 1.3 million residents. The city lies about an hour east of Banff, Canada’s first national park. And it played host to the 1986 Olympics, a fact the city continues to heavily lean on more than 30 years later.

Looking back, nothing in particular stands out about our time in Calgary. We drove past several old ski facilities used during the Olympic games, spent a limited amount of time downtown, and got the cars oil changed. In short – I don’t feel a strong desire to head back any time soon.

The one picture we took in Calgary

On Friday, after work, we made the short drive west to Banff National Park. After setting up the camper at Tunnel Mountain campground (an enormous campground with over 500 sites!) we headed into the town of Banff. The town sits within the national park and has the vibe of a large ski community, even in the heat summer. While in town, we decided to swing into the park visitor center to plan our weekend. There, we were ‘greeted’ by a warden (what they call their park rangers in Canada) who informed us that “you don’t have to do anything you don’t want to do” in the park and that there’s “nothing that you need to see”. Thanks for the guidance Sophia.

Beautiful Banff!

Like most weekends, our time was primarily spent hiking. Saturday, we climbed the Cory Pass Loop – a strenuous hike that follows a seemingly endless set of switchbacks before leading up a picturesque mountain ridgeline. The trail then crosses through a mile of rocks and boulders before entering a densely-forested ravine that follows a creek down the mountain. The trek was tiring but a great way to start our weekend!

One of many breaks on the way up

On Sunday, we got up early and drove to Lake Louise. Perhaps the most popular destination in the park, the lake was already crawling with tourists early in the morning. We were able to escape most of the crowd by hiking around the lake and up to a remote tea house. The tea house is staffed by seasonal workers who hike in on several day rotations and cook all the food on site with supplies air dropped in by helicopter. After munching down a heavy piece of chocolate cake, we continued up the trail to check out the glaciers.

Great cake and great views!

While I don’t know if Banff is a good representation of all of Canada’s national parks, I felt like their park system is managed very differently. While the US national parks often contain guest lodges, a small handful of gift shops, and restaurants to service visitors, Banff plays host to a far larger commercial enterprise. From the town of Banff, located in the park, to the railroad track, the ski slopes, and the trans-Canadian highway, Banff seems to specialize in accessibility, not conservation. That’s not a slight to the park though – I think both Liz and I really enjoyed our weekend and I’d love to make it back again someday to see the park from its ski slopes.

Better glaciers than Glacier

Montana

We began our time in Montana by visiting Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument.  Minutes off Interstate 90, the park is famous for being Custer’s Last Stand, where Colonel Custer and over 250 soldiers died attacking a group of Lakota and other Plains Indians.  The battle was a huge victory for the Indians but their good fortune was short lived as the US government continued to break treaties in the following years and force the natives into reservations.  We watched a very informative video and listened to a graphic telling of the battle by a ranger.

Photo courtesy of the NPS

After spending a night in Billings, we continued to Bozeman, the fourth largest city in Montana.  We stayed at an amazing campground in Gallatin National Forest, about 30 minutes from downtown.  Nestled in the mountains with a beautiful creek rushing right by our campsite, it’s my new favorite campground.  Although it had no electricity, showers, or cell service, it made up for it in beauty and tranquility.

Reading creekside

We spent one afternoon exploring Hyalite Canyon.  On the drive home, after hiking around the reservoir and exploring Palisade Waterfall, we saw a moose! It was standing right next to the road!  After overcoming my surprise, I snapped a picture before it ambled back into the forest.

Palisade Waterfall

A MOOSE!

From Bozeman, we headed west to Missoula.  We planned a majority of our summer/fall travels around attending Traveler’s Rest – a musical festival put on by the Decembrists.  In addition to the Decembrists headlining both nights, some of our other favorite bands were performing – Sylvan Esso, Belle & Sebastian, the Head and the Heart and Shakey Graves.   Everyone put on a great show and 2017 continues to be a great year of concerts for us.

Hanging out in the VIP section!

Due to Zach’s plantar fasciitis, my sprained ankle, and our lack of showers at both our Bozeman and Missoula campgrounds, we headed to the pool! This past year has been the first time since middle school that I haven’t regularly swam.  It was great to get back in the water and avoid not showering for two straight weeks.  Apparently, I’ve never swam laps with Zach – he was much better than I was expecting!

Zach considering going for a swim in the creek?

Now that we’re further north and at higher elevations, the nights get much colder.  I already struggle to get moving in the morning and near freezing temperatures don’t make it any easier.  Our camper does have a heater but in my mind, it wastes too much propane and I think that sleeping in the cold is helping me lose weight.  But Montana sure had some great sunrises, which made getting out of bed a little better.

This is actually a sunset

 

Medford

There are a few things I miss about Columbus – the free lunches at work, the ability to drive home for the weekend, and Hounddog’s Pizza. But my favorite thing to do in Columbus, hanging out with Tyler and Whitney, wouldn’t have been possible even if we had stayed in C-Bus.  Zach’s brother Tyler and his family moved out to Medford, Oregon in December and we went from seeing them almost weekly, to not seeing them for months.  Since our springtime travels in the southwest weren’t taking us near Oregon, we left Lucy in the Las Vegas airport oversized parking lot and flew up to Oregon.

Oregon has so many waterfalls!

It was great to see Tyler, Whitney, Sage and June again.  Our first weekend, we explored the town of Medford, stopping by the local Comic-Con and eating at a local brewery.  After lunch, Zach, Tyler, and I biked up the local mountain, Roxyann Butte.  As a cautious rider, I enjoyed the way up, on a wide gradual road, much more than the way down, on a narrow, steep, rocky trail.  I rode my brakes the entire time and the guys spent most of their time waiting for me.

Biking up the mountain

On Sunday, we travelled south to hike Pilot Rock.  Our driver missed the turn and we ended up in California for a few minutes before turning around (our 13th state of the trip!).  The hike started out easily enough but soon became difficult due to steep, icy sections of trail.  Considering we had a baby and a four-year-old with us, things went relatively well.  The trail ended at the actual Pilot Rock, a very steep volcano plug.  Whitney and I headed down with the kids while Zach and Tyler made the treacherous climb to the top.

Zach and Tyler made it to the top of Pilot Rock

Unfortunately, we all had to work during the week but still managed to find time for fun.  Their house had the perfect backyard for croquet.  We got a little creative with the course setup which made an antiquated English game relevant again.  We also went to multiple wineries, including one within walking distance from their house.

Great wine, food, and company!

Nearly every night we played a game after the kids went to bed.  I love board games but there’s not a ton of great options for two players.  Luckily, Tyler likes games almost as much as me and we could usually convince Zach and Whitney to play with us. Euchre, Super Smash Brothers, Mario Party, Pirate’s Cove and my favorite, Agricola were all played multiple times throughout the week.

No picture of us playing games, so one of me and the Rogue River instead

My imagination and creativity were stretched playing Superhero Princesses with Sage. We both fought girl-eating giants and made macaroni-and-cheese soup for the prince.  I liked to think I was one of June’s favorites back in Ohio but she always seemed to cry when I was around.  Even though she may not like me, she’s still one of my favorites.

June liked Zach a lot more than me

The second weekend in Medford, we headed north.  Unfortunately, all the hikes we had planned were still closed due to snow so we headed to Crater Lake National Park. There was so much snow there – I was surprised it was open!

SO MUCH SNOW

The lake was breathtakingly beautiful and we didn’t let the piles of snow keep us from hiking.  There were obviously no trails visible so we followed the general rim of the lake, throwing snow balls, climbing up snow mounds and trying to jump as deep as possible into the snow.  Since we spent the past few months in the south, we hadn’t seen any snow.  I love winter so I was very happy to finally be surrounded by snow.

Crater Lake National Park

Before we knew it, Monday had arrived and it was time to fly back.  We had a great time visiting in Medford and are already trying to fit another visit in this fall. Thanks for hosting us Tyler and Whitney!

Phoenix

After wrapping up our two-week stint in Tucson, it was off to Phoenix. And, to be honest, I was looking forward to this stop least of our first months on the road. “What is there to do in Phoenix?” I prodded Liz. “Tons” she replied. And, as it turned out, we found enough to keep entertained. In retrospect, I shouldn’t be surprised, having grown up on Ohio entertainment for years.

A Phoenix sunset

It helped that our stay was broken into two pieces – a sandwich – with Phoenix serving as the sourdough bread around a hearty helping of Las Vegas roast beef and old commune mustard. The bottom slice was thin – a Tuesday thru Thursday in which we played bar trivia and recouped from our past weekend in the Guadalupe Mountains and Carlsbad Caverns.

Eating an actual sandwich

On Thursday, my 26th birthday, Liz and I headed up to Las Vegas to catch Bon Iver at the Hard Rock Café and Casino. It was Liz’s first time in Nevada, and, by extension, Las Vegas. In a city known for its entertainment – I didn’t expect we would be part of the show. However, leaving the casino hotel the next morning, we gave a man, self-proclaimed to have “traveled millions of miles” a good laugh. I guess I didn’t think anything of lugging our milk crate clothes cartons through the casino floor – but he claimed it was a first and insisted on a picture.

Cartons of clothes and this is what he wears

Friday night, we moved up The Strip to the iconic Mirage. After indulging in the unlimited beer and wine buffet, we took part in the cities most well know tradition – throwing our money at the casino fat cats. The next morning, not feeling I had done my part, I laid down two hundred clams on the Toronto Raptors to win the finals.

The Mirage

On the way out of town, we swung by the best dam site of our trip yet – the Hoover Dam. We didn’t have time to dilly-dally though as we had strict reservations that night at a run-down commune, Arcosanti. The ‘village’ didn’t disappoint. I booked the night because, after all, the goal of the trip was to not only see as much of the good ol’ US of A as possible, but to also experience its cultural breadth. The experimental town has about 60 permanent residents who live in and around a small complex of buildings designed by architect Paolo Soleri. The night we stayed, a surprisingly enjoyable drum show – a combination of both Japanese and Native American performers – pounded through the towns amphitheater.

Arcosanti

The next morning, Easter Sunday, we headed back to Phoenix, driving directly to the Musical Instrument Museum. I think both Liz and I were thoroughly impressed with the museum’s collection – over 16,000 different instruments from around the world. Accompanying the instruments was a unique audio tour which played clips of music, native to the country’s exhibit you were standing near, into your headset.

An Octobass

Later that week we saw the XX, one of Liz’s favorite bands, perform is Mesa. The next day we met up with Matt and Will – who had just flown into town to run the Grand Canyon rim-to-rim-to-rim that weekend. And, after grabbing dinner with the two, met up with Liz’s parents who had just arrived in town.

~musical interlude~

 

The Sunday we got back to Phoenix, our laundry had been piling up and it was time to finally break down and run a few loads through the wash. While this had never been an issue in past accommodations – and the listing indicated a washer/dryer were available – we were in for a rude surprise when later that evening our ‘host’ lectured us for several minutes, repeating that we were to ‘not touch his stuff.’ It’s kind of hard not to touch someone’s stuff when you’re living in their house.

After that incident, we circled back on a conversation we had discussed for weeks prior to setting off on our journey, and ultimately decided it was time to buy a travel trailer. The past few spare bedroom’s we stayed in were off-putting. And, while we enjoyed the full-units we had occupied, we couldn’t afford to stay in one all the time.

So, most of our second week in Phoenix was spent discussing, planning and eventually purchasing a camper trailer. Up to this point we had been living in Airbnb’s. For those unfamiliar with the concept – Airbnb is a platform that allows folks with spare rooms, or even houses, to rent them out on a nightly basis to others. While the cost of renting an entire house or even hotel room can be very high – we had been able to afford the much lower rate usually charged by renting a spare bedroom (often around $50 a night.)

Once we made up our mind to buy a trailer, we hit the gas, checking out a few used trailers the first night, and buying a new one the next day. This sudden change of plans flipped the table on our months of planning. We had Airbnb’s reserved through the better part of the next three months. Luckily, most Airbnb’s have a pretty lax cancelation policy and we received almost all our deposits back.

Our new home!

Time will tell, but up to this point I haven’t regretted the purchase yet. That is, barring a few fleeting moments after I managed to shave its side on a gas station pump barrier the day we got it.