Mardi Gras

Well it’s been nearly three weeks since we’ve left New Orleans. I’ve found it a lot harder to keep pace with these updates than I thought it would be. Even though I’m writing half or less of em’, there’s just always so many other things to do. When you’re in a city for a week, sometimes less, every night not out absorbing as much as possible feels wasted. Yet, at the same time, without taking the time to stop and reflect it can easily become a blur. What were we doing a month ago? Heck, what did we do last night? Be warned – the rest of this post has been written almost three weeks and three cities ago, so its contents may be altered, misremembered, or flat out made up.

To say I didn’t plan part of the first few months of our trip around being in New Orleans over Mardi Gras would be a lie. After all, the goal of this trip, at least for myself, is to absorb the culture, beauty, and diversity of the United States from every angle and there aren’t many cultural events more iconic than Mardi Gras.

However, an unexpected pit-stop for an appendectomy in Mississippi left me ill equipped to handle the Bourbon Street crowds. Luckily, there’s more to the festival than the late night stupor. For weeks, parades close down streets and command throngs of tailgaters, much like an OSU game day in Columbus. Liz and I attended one of the parades, a several hour long stream of floats, each dedicated to a pop culture celebrity of the past, including Marilyn Monroe, Abe Lincoln, and Elvis. All faux celebrities threw beaded plastic necklaces in lieu of candy. Half way through, I had enough necklaces to cause a slight pain in the shoulders under their weight.

Beyond the parades, walking the French Quarter offered an unmatched opportunity for people watching. Coffee and beignets at Café Du Monde gave us a great vantage point to observe the hordes. Being new to town, Liz and I went plain-clothed, unaware most attend dressed head to toe in colorful and unique costumes (although given Liz’s aversions to Halloween, I doubt knowing would have made a difference in her dress.)

We tried to spend as much time as possible outside the confines of our rented room. Not only because we wanted to absorb as much of NOLA as possible, but also because the house made us a little uneasy. From the wheezing, homely, lap dog that stared us down while we ate, to the disheveled counters, it was hard to feel settled.

Looking back, I’m glad we included New Orleans in our itinerary, although I don’t feel a need to head back any time soon. To those looking to make the trip themselves, I’d recommend hitting up the NOLA classics; grabbing a coffee at Café Du Monde and strolling down Bourbon Street.

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2 thoughts on “Mardi Gras

  1. Hi Zach. I see a second career in the making for the both of you. Your writing is interesting and inspiring. And funny. Thanks for sharing your adventures to those of us that are home-bound and encumbered with kids. LOL 😉 LinZ

    Like

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